HELPFUL BOOKS

The following are a list of books that have proved to be helpful through out my journey with foster care and adoption.

The Connected Child

Bring Hope and Healing to Your Adoptive Family

Book by David R. Cross, Karyn B. Purvis, and Wendy Lyons Sunshine

The Lost Boy

This harrowing but ultimately uplifting true story of a boy's journey through the foster-care system in search of a family to love. This is Dave Pelzer's long-awaited sequel to "A Child Called 'It'." "The Lost Boy" is Pelzer's story -- a moving sequel and inspirational read for all.

A Child Called It

This book chronicles the unforgettable account of one of the most severe child abuse cases in California history. It is the story of Dave Pelzer, who was brutally beaten and starved by his emotionally unstable, alcoholic mother.

Parenting in the Eye of the Storm

The Adoptive Parent’s Guide to Navigating the Teen Years 

Adult adoptee and family therapist Katie Naftzger shares her personal and professional wisdom in this guide to help adoptive parents remain a calm parental influence in the midst of stormy and erratic teen behavior.

The Foster Parenting Toolbox

For those caring for children who have come to them from broken and battered families through the child welfare system, the rewards can seem small and the challenges more intense than anything you have ever experienced. Raising children from tough beginnings, working with the child welfare system, and advocating for the children in your care can be difficult with a steep learning curve. But now, foster and resource parents have a place to turn to for answers, comfort, and a deep community connection.

Another Place at the Table

The startling and ultimately uplifting narrative of one woman's thirteen-year experience as a foster parent.

For more than a decade, Kathy Harrison has sheltered a shifting cast of troubled youngsters-the offspring of prostitutes and addicts; the sons and daughters of abusers; and teenage parents who aren't equipped for parenthood. All this, in addition to raising her three biological sons and two adopted daughters. What would motivate someone to give herself over to constant, largely uncompensated chaos? For Harrison, the answer is easy.

Another Place at the Table is the story of life at our social services' front lines, centered on three children who, when they come together in Harrison's home, nearly destroy it. It is the frank first-person story of a woman whose compassionate best intentions for a child are sometimes all that stand between violence and redemption.